About your Search

20130416
20130424
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6
to science, technology, engineering and math? and i'm happy to have so many key members of my science team who are here today including my chief science adviser, john holder, who's here. there's john. nih director francis collins. there's francis right there, the tall guy. we've got acting director of the national science foundation, cora merit, there's cora, and we've got real life astronaut and nasa administrator charles bolton. where's charlie? there he is right there. we need to make in this a priority, train an army of new teachers in these subject areas and to make sure that all of us as a country are lifting up these subjects for the respect that that they deserve. you know, and one of the things i'm concerned about is that as a culture, you know, we're great consumers of technology, but we're not always properly respecting the people who are in the labs and, you know, behind the scenes creating the stuff that we now take for granted. and we've got to give the millions of americans who work in science and technology not only the kind of respect they deserve, but also new ways to eng
technology, it's the only way to track them. if we invested what we should've in the air traffic system, we would have -- may not solve all of chuck's problems, but a much faster, flowing system. >> by the way, if you modernize it, you can cut back on some of the workforce permanently and save money there. that's the other issue. it's very labor intensive because of the issue that steve just described. >> before we go to break, the president is dining tonight with members of the senate, all women, isn't that nice? >> that's great. >> chuck todd, thank you. we'll see you at 9:00 on the "daily rundown." >> i'm surprised that didn't get ugly just then. >> right. >> that's great. >> we went to counseling. >>> up next, steve rattner has charts on signs of a spring slowdown. more "morning joe" when we come back. but i wondered what a i tcustomer thought? is great, hi nia... nice to meet you nia, i'm mike. what do you drive? i have a ford explorer, i love my car. and you're treating it well? yes i am. there are a lot of places you could take your explorer for service, why do you bring it back to t
analysts are doing right now backed in their headquarters. they're using very cutting edge technological tools to mine any of the data that they are able to pull from the first suspect who was killed early this morning. so his travel records, phone records, anything that they could look at, social security number to figure out who might be in the ever-expanding circle of people who knew him. these cutting edge tools would also look on the internet. did these individuals and this is a new thing that happened post-9/11 is that when you are confronted with a potential terrorism threat and knew the individual the first thing you did was go to social media, check on facebook, check on, you know, twitter. >> speak of twitter, the boston police department just tweeted an hour ago, an alert to the media not to disclose the tactical information to compromise officer safety with the homes that are being searched. there are a lot of crews up in boston and a lot of people covering this and a lot of risks in there. >> with the fact that the individuals had ieds with them overnight and were throwing t
time, you could argue that it means a decrease in personnel. because you're using technology, using cameras to replace, you know, eyeballs. but i don't think we've come to that determination. we're down -- the police department is down 6,000 police officers than where we were 11 years ago. so we've already sort of paid the price. and we're using to a certain extent technology to plug the gaps. we're increasing the number of cameras that we have. one of the things that we're doing, we had it in motion prior to the boston marathon. but we want to increase the number of mobile cameras that we have so we can put them up at events and then move them to other events. along our marathon route, we have 220 cameras. but most of them are on bridges. we want to increase at least the public sector cameras that we have along that route. >> all right. new york city police commissioner, ray kelly, thank you very much. it's always good to see you. >> thank you for the great job you keep doing for the city. >> thank you. >>> a new book on afghanistan that's not so good. president hamid karzai had to
screenings. it is non-invasive process and don't open your bag. but we do use technology to scan for any potential let in the form of the explosives. those are the types of tactics we use to keep customers safe on what is an open system and we are, of course, operating in the nation's capital. these are all prudent steps that we take to help keep the system safe. more importantly, our customers safe. >> they are also stepping up k-9 patrols in all of the stations. stay with news4 and nbcwashington.com all day long for the very latest on the terror in boston. coming up in the next half hour we are going to look at just how hard it is to guarantee that kind of security at big public events like the one yesterday. >>> today many people in our area are remembering another tragedy. this is the sixth anniversary of the shootings in virginia tech. 32 people were killed six years g ago today. it marks the 18th anniversary of the oklahoma city bombing and the shooting at columbine high school. >>> angie goss is at the live december week airport problems in new york. >> yes. we are hearing unconfi
records are prime targets for attackers to steal. according to the information technology industry council, 18 adults become victims to cybercrime, including identity campaigns ishing every second. this adds up to 1 1/2 million cybercrime victims each day. cyberattacks present a very real and dangerous threat to the united states, however the government currently
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)